Kathy L. Anderson, DO, FAOCD

Board Certified Dermatologist

510 E. Druid Road, Suite A
Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 462-5242

 

Your first visit to Dr. Kathy L. Anderson involves a few special steps so that we can get to know you. To understand what to expect, please read through this page. You'll find all the practical information you need, such as a map and directions to our office, practice hours, payment policies and more.

There's also background information about our committed staff and our first visit procedures. You can also save some time by printing out and completing the patient forms in advance of your appointment.

Planning Your First Visit

  • Dr. Anderson looks forward to welcoming you to our practice and helping ensure that you receive the best medical care possible.  
  • When scheduling your first visit, please be specific as to whether you wish to make an appointment for full body skin exam or for an evaluation of a specific issue.  Out of respect for our other patients, please inform us of your specific concerns when your appointment is scheduled, and honoring this request when you meet with Dr. Anderson.
  • When you arrive, please plan to fill out new patient paperwork that may take up to 15 minutes.  
  • We ask that you plan accordingly and please bring a parent, companion or a translator as needed to expedite this process.  
  • If you a patient under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you to the first visit.  
  • We want to address all of your concerns; however, time constraints often prohibit us from being able to discuss a long list of skin conditions. Therefore, we ask that you limit your first visit to one or two pressing issues that we can thoroughly investigate.  After you first appointment, we would be happy to schedule another visit within a short period of time to address your remaining concerns.
  • Payment is due at the time of service.  Please be prepared to pay any co-payment, deductible and/or co-insurance fees at the conclusion of your visit.  We will verify your insurance prior to your appointment and discuss your financial obligations upon arrival to our office.  

Patient Forms

Please print and fill out these forms so we can expedite your first visit:

Completion of the Cosmetic Interest Questionnaire is optional

Completion of the Release of Medical Records for is optional.

Map and Directions

 

 

It is estimated that about one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder at some time in their lives caused by the disease. Diabetics are more susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections; allergic reactions to medications, insect bites or foods; dry itchy skin as a result of poor blood circulation; and infections from foot injuries for people with neuropathy.

There are a number of diabetes-specific skin conditions:

Acanthosis Nigricans. A slowly progressing skin condition, which turns some areas of skin, usually in the folds or creases, into dark, thick and velvet-textured skin. Acanthosis nigricans often precedes the diagnosis of diabetes. It is sometimes inherited, but is usually triggered by high insulin levels. It can occur at any age and usually strikes people who are obese. There is no treatment for the condition except to reduce insulin levels. Prescription creams may help lighten the affected area.

Diabetic Blisters. Rare blisters that appear on the hands, toes, feet or forearms that are thought to be caused by diabetic neuropathy.

Diabetic Dermopathy. Round, brown or purple scaly patches that most frequently appear on the front of the legs (most often the shins) and look like age spots. They are caused by changes in small blood vessels. Diabetic dermopathy occurs more often in people who have suffered from diabetes for decades. They are harmless, requiring no medical intervention, but they are slow to heal.

Digital Sclerosis. This condition appears as thick, waxy and tight skin on toes, fingers and hands, which can cause stiffness in the digits. Getting blood glucose levels back to normal helps alleviate this skin condition.

Disseminated Granuloma Annulare. A red or reddish-brown rash that forms a bull's eye on the skin, usually on the fingers, toes or ears. While not serious, it is advised that you talk to your dermatologist about taking steroid medications to make the rash go away.

Eruptive Xanthomatosis. A pea-like enlargement in the skin with a red halo that itches. It most frequently appears on the hands, feet, arms, legs or buttocks. It is often a response to high triglycerides. Keeping blood glucose levels in the normal range helps this condition subside.

Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum. This condition is similar to diabetic dermopathy, but the spots are larger, fewer, deeper in the skin and have a shiny porcelain-like appearance. It is often itchy or painful. It goes through cycles of being active and inactive. It is caused by changes in collagen and fat underneath the skin. Women are three times more likely to get this condition than are men. Typically, topical steroids are used to treat necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. In more severe cases, cortisone injections may be required.

Vitiligo. Vitiligo refers to the development of white patches anywhere on the skin. It usually affects areas of skin that have been exposed to sun. It also appears in body folds, near moles or at the site of previous skin injury. The condition is permanent and there is no known cure or prevention. However, there are some treatments that can be used to improve the appearance of the skin, such as steroid creams and ultraviolet light therapy.