Kathy L. Anderson, DO, FAOCD

Board Certified Dermatologist

510 E. Druid Road, Suite A
Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 462-5242

 

Your first visit to Dr. Kathy L. Anderson involves a few special steps so that we can get to know you. To understand what to expect, please read through this page. You'll find all the practical information you need, such as a map and directions to our office, practice hours, payment policies and more.

There's also background information about our committed staff and our first visit procedures. You can also save some time by printing out and completing the patient forms in advance of your appointment.

Planning Your First Visit

  • Dr. Anderson looks forward to welcoming you to our practice and helping ensure that you receive the best medical care possible.  
  • When scheduling your first visit, please be specific as to whether you wish to make an appointment for full body skin exam or for an evaluation of a specific issue.  Out of respect for our other patients, please inform us of your specific concerns when your appointment is scheduled, and honoring this request when you meet with Dr. Anderson.
  • When you arrive, please plan to fill out new patient paperwork that may take up to 15 minutes.  
  • We ask that you plan accordingly and please bring a parent, companion or a translator as needed to expedite this process.  
  • If you a patient under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you to the first visit.  
  • We want to address all of your concerns; however, time constraints often prohibit us from being able to discuss a long list of skin conditions. Therefore, we ask that you limit your first visit to one or two pressing issues that we can thoroughly investigate.  After you first appointment, we would be happy to schedule another visit within a short period of time to address your remaining concerns.
  • Payment is due at the time of service.  Please be prepared to pay any co-payment, deductible and/or co-insurance fees at the conclusion of your visit.  We will verify your insurance prior to your appointment and discuss your financial obligations upon arrival to our office.  

Patient Forms

Please print and fill out these forms so we can expedite your first visit:

Completion of the Cosmetic Interest Questionnaire is optional

Completion of the Release of Medical Records for is optional.

Map and Directions

 

 

The skin is the body's largest organ and accounts for roughly 18% of an adult's weight. It serves as a protective outer layer that keeps in moisture and keeps out invasive organism (like infections). It protects our organs against injury. It also helps regulate the body's temperature and has self-healing capabilities.

The best way to maintain healthy skin is to prevent skin damage from occurring in the first place. Wrinkles, age spots and leathery patches are all the result of skin damage from overexposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun. But the aging process for skin is unavoidable. As we age, skin becomes dryer and thinner. Repeated movements of facial muscles, such as frowning, smiling or squinting, cause wrinkles over time. Stress, gravity and obesity also contribute to aging skin. And because the skin is thinner, it is more susceptible to bruising.

Photoaging

The premature aging of the skin from ultraviolet light exposure is called photoaging. Photoaging occurs when ultraviolet radiation penetrates deep into the dermis, damaging collagen fibers and causing the increased production of abnormal elastin. This breakdown in fundamental skin structures leads to deep wrinkles, fine lines, discoloration of the skin (age or liver spots), leatheriness and sagging skin.

Skin Care Routine

A healthy skin care routine throughout life can reduce the symptoms of aging in the skin. Be sure to:

  • Wash your face using a gentle cleanser and lukewarm water twice a day.
  • Pat skin dry; don't rub it dry.
  • Exfoliate the skin twice a week to remove dead cells.
  • Apply a moisturizer to skin immediately after a shower or bath.
  • Wear sunscreen with a SPF of at least 15 every day.
  • For women who wear makeup, be sure to leave time each day when the skin is clean and free of makeup.
  • Do not use tanning beds.
  • Maintain a healthy diet and drink lots of water.
  • Get an adequate amount of sleep every day.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Avoid stress.
  • Conduct a monthly self-examination of your skin to detect any changes that might lead to cancer.
  • See your dermatologist once a year.

Anti-Aging Treatments

Beyond prevention, in today's world there is a wide range of options for slowing down the affects of aging on the skin. See the Cosmetic Dermatology section of this website for more information about:

  • Botox
  • Chemical peels
  • Dermabrasion
  • Fillers
  • Laser Resurfacing
  • Retinoids

Skin Infections

Anyone who has a break in the skin is at risk for an infection. There are three types of skin infections:

Bacterial Infection

There are many bacteria that live on the surface of healthy skin. But with a break in the skin, these bacteria can invade the outer layer of skin and cause an infection and rash. Staph is a common cause of bacterial infections of the skin. Impetigo is one of the most common causes of skin infections in children. Oral or topical antibiotics are used to treat bacterial skin infections.

Viral Infection

Viruses are parasitic organisms that can live and grow inside living cells. They cause either a degeneration or a proliferation of the cell. Most causes of viral skin infections are either from Human Papilloma Virus, which causes warts, or Human Herpes Virus, which causes cold sores, chicken pox, shingles, genital herpes and mononucleosis. Viruses do not respond to antibiotics. Generally, medications are prescribed to help alleviate the symptoms of the infection, such as a rash or itch. Additionally, vaccinations are used to prevent viral infections.

Fungal Infections

Fungal infections of the human body are called mycoses and affect only the outer layer of skin. Although seen in all areas of the body, skin mycoses most frequently appear as yeast infections, thrush, athlete's foot or jock itch.