Kathy L. Anderson, DO, FAOCD

Board Certified Dermatologist

510 E. Druid Road, Suite A
Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 462-5242

 

Your first visit to Dr. Kathy L. Anderson involves a few special steps so that we can get to know you. To understand what to expect, please read through this page. You'll find all the practical information you need, such as a map and directions to our office, practice hours, payment policies and more.

There's also background information about our committed staff and our first visit procedures. You can also save some time by printing out and completing the patient forms in advance of your appointment.

Planning Your First Visit

  • Dr. Anderson looks forward to welcoming you to our practice and helping ensure that you receive the best medical care possible.  
  • When scheduling your first visit, please be specific as to whether you wish to make an appointment for full body skin exam or for an evaluation of a specific issue.  Out of respect for our other patients, please inform us of your specific concerns when your appointment is scheduled, and honoring this request when you meet with Dr. Anderson.
  • When you arrive, please plan to fill out new patient paperwork that may take up to 15 minutes.  
  • We ask that you plan accordingly and please bring a parent, companion or a translator as needed to expedite this process.  
  • If you a patient under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you to the first visit.  
  • We want to address all of your concerns; however, time constraints often prohibit us from being able to discuss a long list of skin conditions. Therefore, we ask that you limit your first visit to one or two pressing issues that we can thoroughly investigate.  After you first appointment, we would be happy to schedule another visit within a short period of time to address your remaining concerns.
  • Payment is due at the time of service.  Please be prepared to pay any co-payment, deductible and/or co-insurance fees at the conclusion of your visit.  We will verify your insurance prior to your appointment and discuss your financial obligations upon arrival to our office.  

Patient Forms

Please print and fill out these forms so we can expedite your first visit:

Completion of the Cosmetic Interest Questionnaire is optional

Completion of the Release of Medical Records for is optional.

Map and Directions

 

 

Moles are brown or black growths, usually round or oval, that can appear anywhere on the skin. They can be rough or smooth, flat or raised, single or in multiples. They occur when cells that are responsible for skin pigmentation, known as melanocytes, grow in clusters instead of being spread out across the skin. Generally, moles are less than one-quarter inch in size. Most moles appear by the age of 20, although some moles may appear later in life. Most adults have between 10 and 40 moles. Because they last about 50 years, moles may disappear by themselves over time.

Most moles are harmless, but a change in size, shape, color or texture could be indicative of a cancerous growth. Moles that have a higher-than-average chance of becoming cancerous include:

Congenital Nevi

Moles present at birth. The larger their size, the greater the risk for developing into a skin cancer.

Atypical Dysplastic Nevi

Irregularly shaped moles that are larger than average. They often appear to have dark brown centers with light, uneven borders.

Higher frequency of moles

People with 50 or more moles are at a greater risk for developing a skin cancer.

In some cases, abnormal moles may become painful, itchy, scaly or bleed. It's important to keep an eye on your moles so that you can catch any changes early. We recommend doing a visual check of your body monthly, including all areas that don't have sun exposure (such as the scalp, armpits or bottoms of feet).

Use the American Academy of Dermatology's ABCDEs as a guide for assessing whether or not a mole may be becoming cancerous:

Asymmetry: Half the mole does not match the other half in size, shape or color.

Border: The edges of moles are irregular, scalloped, or poorly defined.

Color: The mole is not the same color throughout.

Diameter: The mole is usually greater than 6 millimeters when diagnosed, but may also be smaller.

Evolving: A mole or skin lesion that is different from the rest, or changes in size, shape, or color.

If any of these conditions occur, please make an appointment to see one of our dermatologists right away. The doctor may do a biopsy of the mole to determine if it is or isn't cancerous and/or may surgically remove it.