Kathy L. Anderson, DO, FAOCD

Board Certified Dermatologist

510 E. Druid Road, Suite A
Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 462-5242

 

Your first visit to Dr. Kathy L. Anderson involves a few special steps so that we can get to know you. To understand what to expect, please read through this page. You'll find all the practical information you need, such as a map and directions to our office, practice hours, payment policies and more.

There's also background information about our committed staff and our first visit procedures. You can also save some time by printing out and completing the patient forms in advance of your appointment.

Planning Your First Visit

  • Dr. Anderson looks forward to welcoming you to our practice and helping ensure that you receive the best medical care possible.  
  • When scheduling your first visit, please be specific as to whether you wish to make an appointment for full body skin exam or for an evaluation of a specific issue.  Out of respect for our other patients, please inform us of your specific concerns when your appointment is scheduled, and honoring this request when you meet with Dr. Anderson.
  • When you arrive, please plan to fill out new patient paperwork that may take up to 15 minutes.  
  • We ask that you plan accordingly and please bring a parent, companion or a translator as needed to expedite this process.  
  • If you a patient under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you to the first visit.  
  • We want to address all of your concerns; however, time constraints often prohibit us from being able to discuss a long list of skin conditions. Therefore, we ask that you limit your first visit to one or two pressing issues that we can thoroughly investigate.  After you first appointment, we would be happy to schedule another visit within a short period of time to address your remaining concerns.
  • Payment is due at the time of service.  Please be prepared to pay any co-payment, deductible and/or co-insurance fees at the conclusion of your visit.  We will verify your insurance prior to your appointment and discuss your financial obligations upon arrival to our office.  

Patient Forms

Please print and fill out these forms so we can expedite your first visit:

Completion of the Cosmetic Interest Questionnaire is optional

Completion of the Release of Medical Records for is optional.

Map and Directions

 

 

There are literally hundreds of different kinds of lumps, bumps and cysts associated with the skin. Fortunately, the vast majority of these are harmless and painless. The chart below provides a guide for some of the most common forms of skin lumps, bumps and cysts.

Dermatofibromas

Characteristics

  • Red, brown or purple growth; generally benign
  • Usually found on arms and legs
  • Feels like a hard lump
  • Can be itchy, tender to the touch and sometimes painful

Treatment

  • Usually does not require treatment
  • Most common removal by surgical excision or cryotherapy (freezing it off with liquid nitrogen)

Epidermoid Cysts (Sebaceous Cysts)

Characteristics

  • Round small bumps, usually white or yellow
  • Forms from blocked oil glands in the skin
  • Most commonly appear on the face, back, neck, trunk and genitals
  • Usually benign; occasionally leads to basal or squamous cell skin cancers
  • If infected, will become red and tender
  • Can produce a thick yellow, cheese-like discharge when squeezed

Treatment

  • Antibiotics might be prescribed if there is an underlying infection
  • Dermatologist removes the discharge and the sac (capsule) that make up the walls of the cyst to prevent recurrence
  • Laser surgery may be used for sensitive areas of the skin, like the face

Folliculitis

Characteristics

  • Red pimples around areas having hair
  • Inflammation of the hair follicles
  • Caused by infection or chemical or physical irritation (e.g., shaving, fabrics)
  • Higher incidence among people with diabetes, the obese or those with compromised immune systems

Treatment

  • Topical antibiotics
  • Oral antibiotics
  • Antifungal medications
  • Eliminating the cause

Keratoacanthoma

Characteristics

  • Red, dome-shaped, thick bumps with craters in the center
  • Abnormal growth of hair cells
  • Triggered by minor skin injury such as a cut or bug bite
  • Ultraviolet radiation from sun exposure is the most common risk factor

Treatment

  • Cryotherapy (freezing off the bump with liquid nitrogen
  • Curettage (surgically cutting out or scraping off)

Keratosis Pilaris

Characteristics

  • Small, rough white or red bumps that neither itch nor hurt
  • Usually worse during winter months or when there is low humidity and the skin gets dry

Treatment

  • Usually does not require treatment
  • In most cases disappears on its own by age 30
  • Intensive moisturizing is the first line of treatment
  • For more difficult cases, use of medicated creams with urea or alpha-hydroxy acids

Lipomas

Characteristics

  • Soft fatty tissue tumors or nodules below the skin's surface
  • Usually slow growing and benign
  • Appear most commonly on the trunk, shoulders and neck
  • May be single or multiple
  • Usually painless unless putting pressure on a nerve

Treatment

  • Usually does not require treatment unless it is compressing on the surrounding tissue
  • Easy to remove via excision

Neurofibromas

Characteristics

  • Soft fleshy growths under the skin
  • Slow growing and generally benign and painless
  • Pain may indicate a need for medical attention
  • May experience an electrical shock at the touch

Treatment

  • Usually does not require treatment, particularly if it does not cause any symptoms
  • If it affects a nerve, it may be removed surgically

Skin Cysts

Characteristics

  • Closed pockets of tissue that can be filled with fluid or pus
  • Can appear anywhere on the skin
  • Smooth to the touch; feels like a pea underneath the surface
  • Slow growing and generally is painless and benign
  • Only needs attention if it becomes infected or inflamed

Treatment

  • Usually does not require treatment; often disappears on its own
  • May need to be drained by a physician
  • Inflamed cysts respond to an injection of cortisone, which causes it to shrivel